Uncategorized

In supposedly unprecedented times, there are compelling reasons to turn to the history of medicine. For hope, that epidemics come to an end; for consolation, that the people of the past suffered even more than us; and for insight into…

As the full impact of the coronavirus pandemic slowly starts to become apparent, the question of economic survival – for individuals, businesses and even nation states – is under intense scrutiny. UK-based Italian economist Paola …

Imagine Roger Nichols and Graham Johnson at a dinner party, discussing the composer about whom they have each published an entertaining and learned new biography: Francis Poulenc (1899-1963).

Time has its revolutions. Dynasties rise and fall. How did the line of the ancient Saxon king Cerdic lose the crown in 1066 after 571 years? Tom Licence seeks to find the answer. He succeeds marvellously in this new book …

According to Dorling, the so-called great acceleration that has occurred in recent generations created the culture in which we live and our expectation for a particular kind of progress. He refers to the large majority of older people …

[Timothy Brittain-Catlin’s] book is a wonderful thing, elegantly written and superbly illustrated: it celebrates agreeable human habitats designed by truly creative professionals that show up the dire, ugly, shameful mess being made nowadays.

“People keep saying this is an unprecedented pandemic,” says Bernard-Henri Lévy, France’s rock-star philosopher. “It is not true. Humanity has had to deal with many pandemics, often more grave than this one.”

For the first half of the 20th century, Brooklyn was in disrepair. The area’s elegant brown brick mansions, once owned by New York’s upper class, had either been demolished by the early 1900s or converted into boarding rooms.

A more accurate title for this book would be Why Teaching Writing Matters. Nicholas Delbanco, novelist, critic and Professor Emeritus, distils in its pages the wisdom he gained from half a century of teaching creative writing.

What we need is arts leaders like Tucker who recognise that the paradigm of equality, ‘can’t just be a matter of programming but has to be somehow inscribed in the heart of an organization’ (p.198).