Once upon a time the American artist Dorothea Tanning would have been regarded as a lesser force than her husband Max Ernst. Not so now. Transformations is the fullest and most nuanced account of her trajectory as an artist to date.

On almost any street in almost any city, you’re bound to spot a terse mononym in stylized lettering. Afeks, Cure, Kos or Zerks. Going All City offers a riveting insight into the formative years of Cisco, one of the most prolific taggers…

In 1905, the future poet laureate and experienced seaman John Masefield published Sea Life in Nelson’s Time. It was both his first book and the first in English to examine the lives of the ordinary seaman.

In the mid-1930s the British socialist Basil Bunting wrote to his fellow poet and friend, the American fascist Ezra Pound, lamenting the difficulty of achieving radical change in Britain. Bunting told Pound that the nation’s “owners” …

In February 1959, while on a visit to fellow composer Luciano Berio in Milan, John Cage appeared five times on a popular Italian television quiz show called Lascia o Raddoppia. Cage performed several new sound pieces…

None of us is inherently immune to the binary logic – man/woman, heterosexual/homosexual, white/black – of our dominant culture. This view forces us to the extremes; to embrace multiplicity, or legitimate ourselves by denying it.

There is something oddly comforting about listening to the Kinks during a global pandemic. Everything you might need while in isolation is there: Kodachrome snapshots of the city and the village green, vividly populated…

Pauline Kael was no fan of Stanley Kubrick’s movies. She deplored his “arctic spirit”. She compared A Clockwork Orange to the work of a Teutonic professor. In her review of 2001: A Space Odyssey, she wrote: “It’s a bad, bad sign…

Brigitte Benkemoun, a French journalist, gets her story off to an intriguing start. She explains that after her husband lost his small Hermès diary, she managed to find a replacement on eBay, listed under “small vintage leather goods”.

In supposedly unprecedented times, there are compelling reasons to turn to the history of medicine. For hope, that epidemics come to an end; for consolation, that the people of the past suffered even more than us; and for insight into…