News and reviews

French Fashion, Women, and the First World War reviewed in the TLS

Added on 29/02/2020

This collection of essays claims to be the first look at the Venn diagram of its subject matter. As Maude Bass-Krueger states in her introduction, “society held women to double standards when it came to getting dressed during the war”.

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The Ruins featured in GQ’s 10 coolest things of the week

Added on 25/02/2020

The debut from Suede founding member and bassist Mat Osman is an altered state of a novel, mixing the crime of LA noir, the ambient cityscapes of JG Ballard and dark language games of Thomas Pynchon.

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Migrant City reviewed in the Spectator

Added on 24/02/2020

Every history of London — and there have been very many — has looked at the importance for the city of migration. Not to mention it would be as inconceivable as ignoring the River Thames. Both, after all, flow directly through the city’s heart.

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Migrant City reviewed in the Sunday Times

Added on 23/02/2020

Anyone curious about the impact of migration on the history and culture of London could do worse than read the chapter on food in this exhaustive history. The capital’s first coffee house was opened in the 1650s by an Armenian…

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Migrant City Book of the Week in the Evening Standard

Added on 21/02/2020

Fifteen minutes by train from Paddington, Southall is a “Little India” in the borough of Ealing. Set back amid the traffic in King Street is an ornate Hindu temple, and from the Punjabi stalls in Orchard Avenue you can buy jalebi.

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The Lost Autobiography of Samuel Steward reviewed in the LRB

Added on 19/02/2020

By​ the time Samuel Steward began to write his autobiography in 1978, at the age of 69, he’d had sex more than four thousand times with more than eight hundred men. Each encounter was carefully recorded in his ‘Stud File’.

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Love is the Drug featured in Newsweek

Added on 14/02/2020

Think of who takes drugs like MDMA and images of waved, 20-somethings partying is more likely to come to mind than a middle-aged couple sat in front of a marriage counselor, thrashing out their deepest regrets and long-held resentments.

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The Order of Forms reviewed in Times Higher Education

Added on 13/02/2020

Alice sits at a table in Wonderland with three strange characters: the Hatter, March Hare and Dormouse. Time, who has fallen out with the Hatter, is absent, and out of pique won’t move the clocks past six.

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Music in the Present Tense reviewed in Times Higher Education

Added on 13/02/2020

“Napoleon is dead; but a new conqueror has already revealed himself to the world; and from Moscow to Naples, from London to Vienna, his name is on every tongue. The fame of this hero knows no bounds save that of civilisation itself.”

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Shamima Begum should be tried in Britain, argues Dr Philip Cunliffe

Added on 13/02/2020

Last week tribunal judges rejected Shamima Begum’s appeal against the decision to strip her of British citizenship. Begum, who is in a refugee camp in northern Syria, lost her citizenship after she left Britain to join Islamic State in 2015.

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Cosmopolitan Dystopia featured in the Daily Mail

Added on 12/02/2020

In his new book Cosmopolitan Dystopia, Dr Philip Cunliffe argues that Slave markets, perpetual war and ethnic cleansing are happening in the Greater Middle East due to an obsession with human rights rather than traditional foreign policy

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Drugs may be able to fix our romantic lives when things go wrong

Added on 12/02/2020

If a pill could make you fall in love and transform your romantic relationships, would you take it? Or if a doctor was able to prescribe an anti-love drug to help a break-up go smoothly, would you urge your partner to make an appointment?

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