News and reviews

The Edwardians and their Houses featured in the SAHGB

Added on 04/05/2020

Timothy Brittain-Catlin’s latest project takes a fresh – even radical – new look at Edwardian domestic architecture, encompassing politics, conservation and the evolving architectural media of the era.

READ MORE

The Romance of American Communism reviewed in the Guardian

Added on 01/05/2020

This isn’t a book about dangerous revolutionaries or what a communist America might actually have looked like – it isn’t even exactly about politics. Instead it is about people whom Gornick …

READ MORE

Why I Write? reviewed in the Times Literary Supplement

Added on 01/05/2020

Anyone seeking a quick primer to the exceptional literary art of Bohumil Hrabal (1914–97) need look no further than the opening shots of Věra Chytilová’s short film The World Cafeteria. There we see, in quick succession: a raucous wedding …

READ MORE

A Little History of Poetry featured in the New Statesman

Added on 29/04/2020

(…) for more than 50 years, [John Carey’s] taut, spry, flexible, idiomatic style has enabled him to engage a large non-specialist audience without, for the most part, stinting his deep infectious belief that literature is serious, and matters.

READ MORE

Survey of London: Volume 53 reviewed in the Guardian

Added on 29/04/2020

Volume 53 of the Survey of London is a bravura exercise in social and cultural history, topography and architecture. With Oxford Street under threat from internet shopping and now made ghostly by the pandemic, in this book’s pages …

READ MORE

Eileen Gray, Designer and Architect praised in the Guardian

Added on 29/04/2020

You might think of 1920s Paris as being at the cutting edge of modern style, but it took the bedroom fantasy of an Irishwoman from County Wexford to catch the eye of the European avant garde. Her curious design is reproduced …

READ MORE

The Toddler in Chief reviewed in the New Statesman

Added on 29/04/2020

Daniel Drezner, a political science professor and regular contributor to the Washington Post, develops two propositions in this crisp, witty and highly readable philippic. The first is that “Donald Trump …

READ MORE

The Multifarious Mr Banks reviewed in the Sunday Times

Added on 26/04/2020

Joseph Banks was the most famous man in England when, in 1771, aged 28, he returned from circumnavigating the world with Captain James Cook aboard Endeavour. Yet now he is all but forgotten.

READ MORE

Can the slowdown lead to a better society?

Added on 25/04/2020

[Dorling] argues that society is not speeding up in the way some claim in books like James Gleik’s Faster: The Acceleration of Just About Everything. Indeed, [he] does an excellent and entertaining job of showing that most of this …

READ MORE

Sons of Waves reviewed in the Spectator

Added on 25/04/2020

For as much as the power of written language may impress us in our own less physical era, Taylor’s work makes clear that it was the personal character and sea-learned ship skills of mostly unlettered sailors and their officers …

READ MORE

Pure Adulteration reviewed in the Times Literary Supplement

Added on 24/04/2020

“Trusting food meant trusting people.” This truth, as well as many of the anxieties of America’s Gilded Age chronicled in Pure Adulteration: Cheating on nature in the age of manufactured food, resonates strongly in the 21st century.

READ MORE

Set the Night on Fire reviewed in the Guardian

Added on 22/04/2020

To its profit and enduring loss, there is probably no city in human history that has been more promiscuously imagined than Los Angeles. For the better part of the century, most of the planet’s population …

READ MORE