News and reviews

Hidden London featured in the Guardian

Added on 09/09/2019

London has been shaped by its railways, ever since the Metropolitan opened as the world’s first underground line in 1863. As the network grew, old stations, tunnels, entrances, passageways and shafts were left behind.

READ MORE

Who is Michael Jang? featured in the British Journal of Photography

Added on 05/09/2019

Michael Jang spent four decades building a vast archive of photography documenting the streets of Los Angeles, from underground artistic communities to adorned celebrities. But, it wasn’t until 2001 that SFMOMA uncovered …

READ MORE

Vanessa Heggie’s Higher and Colder reviewed in Nature

Added on 05/09/2019

The North Pole, South Pole and ‘third pole’, Mount Everest, were prime twentieth-century expeditionary challenges. To physiologists such as Nello Pace and Kåre Rohdal, they were also labs for probing the physical impacts of …

READ MORE

Alberto Manguel’s Fabulous Monsters reviewed in the Spectator

Added on 31/08/2019

Whether we see the primary cause as being postmodernism or cultural fragmentation, the intellectual consensus is that we don’t talk meaningfully to each other because we lack communal stories.

READ MORE

How to Be an Anticapitalist in the 21st Century Guardian review

Added on 30/08/2019

Wright makes the case for what’s wrong with capitalism, what would be better, and how to achieve it. This is the rare book that speaks to both the faithful and the unconverted. You could buy it for your sceptical uncle or militant cousin.

READ MORE

Illuminated Paris reviewed in the Times Literary Supplement

Added on 30/08/2019

Paris was first referred to as La Ville Lumière in the 18th century, an allusion to its role as the locus of the Enlightenment. The name became prophetically apposite during the 19th century with the city’s embrace of the gas lights.

READ MORE

Gentlemen of Uncertain Fortune reviewed in the Spectator

Added on 24/08/2019

Readers of Jane Austen gain a clear idea of the task facing the daughters of gentlemen. They need to secure a husband who can enable them to keep or improve their social & economic status. But what about their opposite numbers?

READ MORE

Pirates review — the lure of the skull & crossbones

Added on 23/08/2019

Except for the silvery ripples created by the ship as it knifed through the dark-blue water, the Bohol Sea was dead calm. Then, as if from nowhere, two small fishing boats appeared and approached the ship to hawk their catch.

READ MORE

Time Within Time reviewed in the Times Literary Supplement

Added on 23/08/2019

In the beginning is a child. A boy, no more than ten, perhaps younger, sleeping outside in the sun. Each time he opens his eyes he sees his mother first – and then, the world. Once or twice he catches her glance before falling asleep again.

READ MORE

Isa Leshko’s images plead for the better treatment of animals

Added on 22/08/2019

As the world’s population ages (9% is currently over 65), we are faced with serious economic and social problems. This book of photographs by the US artist Isa Leshko draws us, anthropomorphically, in the world of old animals.

READ MORE

This New Book Shows The Poetic Side Of Science

Added on 21/08/2019

Scientists aren’t usually known for their poetry, but Sam Illingworth’s A Sonnet To Science highlights the creative side of researchers. The book, with a titular nod to Edgar Allan Poe, profiles six scientists.

READ MORE

Alvin Baltrop Bronx Exhibition reviewed in the Guardian

Added on 19/08/2019

Bronx-born photographer Alvin Baltrop spent days on end documenting gay life at the piers lining Manhattan’s west side. At times, he did so while living in a van. Now, his intimate imagery, is finally receiving the attention it deserves.

READ MORE