News and reviews

Joseph Conrad reviewed in the TLS

Added on 22/04/2021

Robert Hampson’s study is comparatively slim, at around 200 pages. Yet, the most distilled of Conrad’s biographies, it creates its own distinctive image of this constant searcher after le mot juste.

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Survivors shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2021

Added on 21/04/2021

Awarded by the Wolfson Foundation annually for over forty years, the Wolfson History Prize is the UK’s most prestigious history prize. It recognises and celebrates books which combine excellence in research with readability.

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The House of Fragile Things reviewed in the FT

Added on 17/04/2021

‘McAuley… traces the long, vexed relationship of these families with materiality, their faith that they could “create something beautiful in an increasingly hostile environment”, their attempt to control works of art as they could not control life.’

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Reckless Opportunists mentioned in the New Statesman

Added on 15/04/2021

As the author Aeron Davis persuasively argues, it is precisely the breakdown of that class formation that has permitted interlocking cadres of ‘reckless opportunists’ to take power. Government continues to be dominated by elite schools and universities, but that is far less true of business than it used to be.

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Infinitely Full of Hope extracted in the New York Times

Added on 13/04/2021

Why, despite everything, you should have kids (if you want them). In a time of Covid-19, climate change and catastrophe, having a baby is an act of radical hope.

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The Life of Music reviewed in the Literary Review

Added on 12/04/2021

This is always a book about music in performance, and about the art of listening. At almost every turn, I wanted to stop reading and listen to the music Kenyon describes – and consistently felt rewarded for doing so

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The IBM Poster Program featured in Design Reviewed

Added on 12/04/2021

“The IBM Poster Program: Visual Memoranda,” represent some of the most creative examples of mid-century corporate graphic design, while offering a unique commentary into corporate employee communications of the period.

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Terminal Boredom reviewed in The Guardian

Added on 09/04/2021

Izumi Suzuki was a Japanese actor, model and writer. Her turbulent marriage to saxophonist Kaoru Abe, who died of a drug overdose in 1978, followed by her own suicide in 1986, enshrined her as a sort of punk icon for disaffected Japanese youth.

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The Sea View Has Me Again reviewed in the TLS

Added on 09/04/2021

In the pubs of Sheerness everyone knew the black-clad, steady-drinking foreign regular they called “Charles”. To mark Charles’s first Christmas in the seaside town on Sheppey, the Napier’s landlord “baptized” him by pouring a shot of Scotch over his head.

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Closed on Mondays reviewed in Apollo Magazine

Added on 09/04/2021

Why are gold frames ubiquitous, regardless of artist, period or subject? Why do so few contemporary art galleries have windows? What should label texts do? What is the role of facsimiles in displays?

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Visions of Heaven extracted in The Art Newspaper

Added on 07/04/2021

In Visions of Heaven: Dante and the Art of Divine Light, the scholar Martin Kemp presents a unique thesis, examining how Renaissance painters such as Titian and Raphael were influenced by Dante’s conception of divine light.

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A Band with Built-in Hate reviewed in Louder then War

Added on 05/04/2021

…essential reading for anyone who’s ever loved the Who, or wants an insight into the Sixties’ music scene that goes beyond greatest hits compilations and easy generalisations.

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