From Winston Churchill to Windrush and Tony Blair to Brexit, this archival critique and collection of interviews is one of the most profound deconstructions of UK immigration policy that exists.

Cole Porter’s songs glitter and dazzle, and beneath the veneer of Fifth Avenue sophistication they are often surprisingly frank about the joys of sex. Let’s Do It, Let’s Fall in Love is much more than a request to hold hands.

Where, or rather what, would Rebecca be without Manderley, The Forsyte Saga without Robin Hill or Howards End without, well, Howards End? In this collection of 20 sparkling mini-essays, Christina Hardyment sets out …

A few years ago, I was standing with an Israeli acquaintance on a viewing platform looking across Jerusalem. The panorama before us, he assured me, would tell me everything I needed to know about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

This anthology of work by writers across the dividing “green line” reflects the growing contestation of the divisive, right-wing nationalist “Turkish-Cypriot” official narratives and the emergence of unifying, inclusive, perspectives …

An evocative series of portraits capturing Britain’s ‘ordinary folk’ in working class communities over a period of 25 years have been brought together in a stunning new collection. One of Britain’s foremost photographers, [Daniel] Meadows …

A pair of British academics, who have compiled Porter’s correspondence into a forthcoming book entitled The Letters of Cole Porter, found that the musician’s private life was at odds with his public image as a wealthy man bouncing …

Hardman utilises years of researching the fall of the French monarchy, weaving in accounts by those who knew, loved or loathed Marie Antoinette, to offer a broadly convincing portrait of a woman who “inspired loyalty in strangers …

[The author] studied Melville’s original sources to work out what he probably knew rather than what he wrote, delved into specimen tanks below the Natural History Museum in London, interviewed scientists and took to the seas …

From a psychological study of city bankers to the ‘delusion of thrift’ in John Lanchester’s novel Capital, Grace Blakeley [the author of Stolen: How to Save the World from Financialisation] shares her favourite titles on the power of banks.